Redland Green School

RGS Bristol

RGS Local Offer

Frequently Asked Questions (Young People)

Bristol City Council has information about what services and support is available for students and families in their Local Offer.  Please follow the link to the Findability website.

How does the school know if I need extra help?

We know which students need extra help by

What should I do if I think I need extra help?

If you need extra help with your learning you should talk to your teachers.  The teachers’ job is to help all the students in their classes to make progress.  You can also talk to your mentor, House Lead or Wellbeing Lead.  Some students also have a key worker who can help.

How will my work be organised to meet my needs?

All teachers are teachers of students with different and special educational needs. Teachers help each student to learn in the way that suits them.  Some students may do different work to help them to make progress. 

Some students with a high level of special educational needs have a personalised curriculum to help them to be more successful.  This is coordinated by the SENCo, with help from school leaders and the students’ Head of House.

How will I be involved in planning for my needs and who will explain it and help me?

If you need extra help with your learning you should talk to your teachers.  The teachers’ job is to help all the students in their classes to make progress.  You can also talk to your mentor or Head of House.  Some students also have a key worker who can help.

Students with an Education Health and Care Plans (EHCP) will take part in an Annual Review to plan for the next steps in education and the future.  The SENCo, keyworker and your parents will be at this meeting with you.

Who will tell me what I can do to help myself and be more independent?

If you need extra help with your learning you should talk to your teachers.  The teachers’ job is to help all the students in their classes to make progress and be able to work independently. 

Some classes are supported by a Learning Support Assistant who helps all students to make progress with their learning.  Part of their job is to help students to be able to help themselves.

What should I do if I am worried about something?

If you need extra help with your learning you should talk to your teachers.  The teachers’ job is to help all the students in their classes to make progress.  They can provide you with advice and sometimes resources (things) to help you.  Some students also have a key worker who can help.

Students are part of a mentor group with students from other year groups.  All students should help each other, not just the prefects.  The mentor is a teacher who supports the students in the group.  They are good people to ask.  Each mentor group is part of a house.  The Wellbeing Leads can support you if you are finding things difficult or not feeling safe.  Sometimes House Leads, Wellbeing Leads or the SENCo arrange for other people to come into school to help individual students.

Some students also have a key Worker or a Learning Mentor who can help.  Learning Mentors help some students who are not making as much progress as they should.  Key Workers help students with high levels of Special Educational Needs.

How will I know if I am doing as well as I should?

Your work will be assessed by teachers.  Sometimes you will take tests and exams.  Teachers give their students feedback about their work.  This tells students how to improve. 

Teachers and the SENCo monitor how well all students are doing.  Some students have a Key Worker or a Progress Mentor who can help.  Progress Mentors help some students who are not making as much progress as they should.  Key Workers help students with high levels of Special Educational Needs.

You will have a written report each year as well as an end of year grade card.  The report tells you how well you are doing and compares this to your targets. 

Conversations between you, your teachers and parents take place at subject consultation meetings.

Are there staff in school who have had special training to help young people who need extra help?

There are no teachers at Redland Green School with specialist training to meet special educational needs (SEN).  Many teachers and support staff at school have experience of supporting students with SEN to do well in their learning.  Staff at the school sometimes work with specialists to help students with certain difficulties, for example hearing, vision or ASD.

All staff at the school are aware of disabilities and work to make sure everyone is treated fairly.  Teachers are told about the needs of the students in their classes and how these students can be helped. 

Some Learning Support Assistants and the SENCo have had training to help students with special educational needs.  Some teachers have had some training to meet needs.  

Can the school get extra help from experts if they need to? (e.g. advice and training on medical conditions)

Staff at the school sometimes work with specialists to help students with certain difficulties, for example hearing, vision or ASD.

When required, the school works with experts that include:

If I have difficulty in taking part in school activities what different arrangements can be made and who can help me?

Redland Green School aims to make sure that all students are properly supported so that they can play a full and active role in school life.  Where it is reasonable to do so the school will make adjustments and provide support to ensure students are included in activities and trips

All students have equal access to trips and activities.  However, students with SEND may not be able to access every trip, even with reasonable adjustments in place, due to the nature of the trip itself. 

If you need extra help you can talk to your teachers, mentor or Head of House.  Some students with high levels of special educational needs (SEN) have a key worker at school.  The key worker can help students.  The SENCo works trip and activity leaders to see if we can make adjustments to include everyone.

How accessible is the school?

The school has a sloping central street and is based over 4 floors.  A lift connects the floors.  There are toilets for disabled users on each floor.  There are disabled parking spaces.  The stairs have high visibility edges.  There are no other special adaptations to the building to support vision or hearing difficulties. 

What help is there to help me to take the next steps in my education?

All schools have to support students to make the transition to the next stage in education and towards being an adult.  This is discussed at the annual review for students with statements of SEN or Education Health and Care Plans.  

Planning for the future is part of the Annual Review that students with statements of EHC Plans attend with their parents, the SENCo and some other staff from the school.

Moving from primary to secondary school:

Primary school staff tell secondary school staff about students’ needs and what help they need.  The SENCo makes sure the teachers know how to help you to learn. 

When moving from year 6 to year 7 the primary schools let us know if any student has a high level of additional need.  These children will be included in a thorough plan to support them to make a successful transition to Redland Green School.  This involves 3 visits to the school before starting in September.

Moving from to a new secondary school:

When students move schools teachers tell staff at the new school about students’ needs and what help they need.  The SENCo makes sure the teachers know how to help you to learn.

Moving into Year 10

Parents of year 9 students are invited to an options evening to discuss curriculum choices for year 10 and 11.  Teachers and the SENCo can help you to make the choices that are best for you.

Moving to post-16 education

The school works in partnership with agencies (Learning Partnership West) commissioned by the Local Authority to support successful progression to post-16 education.  All schools provide students with independent advice and guidance.  

In post 16 education at Redland Green School an academic mentor supports all students with academic study skills as well as those with additional needs. As part of transition, the academic mentor will meet one to one with students with additional learning needs as well as liaising with teaching staff to ensure they are aware of how to best to support a student in the classroom. Transition for year 11 students starts early and meetings take place with students and/or parents where specific needs have to be met. The academic mentor also works with previous schools to ensure information regarding access arrangements is in place. 

Preparing for Adulthood

Further information is available through this link.